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Tuning FAQ

What should be done before a tuning appointment?

Please remove all items from the top of the piano. In almost all instances, it is not necessary to move the piano away from the wall. If the piano has any mechanical problems, such as a sticking key, make note of which key is affected.

How quiet should it be during a tuning?
During a tuning, the quieter the environment around the piano, the better. It is especially difficult to tune with noise from running water while washing dishes, or noisy appliances such as vacuum cleaners and leaf blowers. Please avoid loud conversations, or having music or the TV playing nearby.
How often should a piano be tuned?

Nearly all manufacturers recommend that their pianos be tuned at least twice a year, and this is a good rule of thumb for most pianos.

Why do pianos go out of tune?

The most common reason for pianos going out of tune is the seasonal change in climate, especially relative humidity, which causes the wood in a piano to expand and contract. This in turn causes the tension of the strings to change, and the piano goes out of tune.

How can I help keep my piano in tune?

Maintaining stable temperature and humidity levels in your home is one of the best things you can do to help tunings last longer.

My piano has new strings. Shouldn't it stay in tune longer?

Actually, new or newly re-strung pianos usually need more frequent tunings for the first year or so as their strings continue to stretch.

Does a piano need to be tuned after it's moved?

Moving a piano to a new location inside your home may cause a piano to go out of tune, especially an upright piano. Moving a piano to a new house or apartment will almost certainly put the piano out of tune.

My piano is really out of tune. Will it need more than one tuning?

If a piano is allowed to drop far off pitch, necessitating an extra tuning pass to achieve the large change in string tension to get it back in tune properly (a “pitch raise”), it will need a follow-up tuning sooner than it would otherwise.

What about mechanical problems?

Mechanical problems such as loose tuning pins can cause a piano to go out of tune. These problems are especially prevalent in older pianos.